Product Type
Application Area
Lighting Effect
Product Type
Application Area
Lighting Effect

The Estonian National Museum

About Project


This museum shaped like an elegant glass box, is located outside the town of Tartu, on a former Soviet air force base. The Estonian National Museum symbolizes the opening of a new era for this former USSR country. Ever since 1991 when the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics collapsed, Estonia has focused on creating a new cultural and national identity for itself.

The design for the museum was created by DGT Architects - a studio of three young architects from Italy, Libya and Japan. An international competition had been launched for the building's design and construction and they astonished the commission set up to judge it with their ability to interpret the country's history and character. They chose, for example, to relocate the project to the runway of the former military base. This artificial line drawn through Tartu's beautiful natural landscapes of forests, lakes and rolling hills is a powerful symbol and the resulting building is a long ramp-shaped structure generated by the slight slant of the runway. As the building lifts off the ground it creates a series of covered spaces that house the museum's various highly functional complexes. The interiors and exteriors are separated by a light glass wall, so the only real difference between the inside and the outside is the sloping roof and the air conditioning of the environments. This means the exhibition area is in continuous visual interaction with the outside landscape thanks to a sophisticated glass buffering system that guarantees a high level of heat insulation, as well as an influx of indirect natural light on the North side, where the exhibitions and public areas are located. The Southern side of the building, on the other hand, houses offices, libraries and teaching halls that enjoy direct sunlight. The top of the building is lit by 53 W ceiling-mounted Linealuce luminaires, while 20 W floor-recessed luminaires highlight the project's main feature: the museum's glass frontage and the glass wall between the inside and outside. Both versions have Wall Grazing optics and a Neutral White colour temperature. This creates a homogeneous effect over the entire length and height of the building, whereas the museum entrance is lit by a network of Light Up Walk light points positioned under the entrance ceiling. They are all LED luminaires, so they also help reduce the building's energy consumption levels as specifically requested by the Estonian Ministry of Culture. The project was also awarded the AFEX (Overseas French Architects) prize, that recognises the excellence of French architecture around the world.

This museum shaped like an elegant glass box, is located outside the town of Tartu, on a former Soviet air force base. The Estonian National Museum symbolizes the opening of a new era for this former USSR country. Ever since 1991 when the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics collapsed, Estonia has focused on creating a new cultural and national identity for itself.

The design for the museum was created by DGT Architects - a studio of three young architects from Italy, Libya and Japan. An international competition had been launched for the building's design and construction and they astonished the commission set up to judge it with their ability to interpret the country's history and character. They chose, for example, to relocate the project to the runway of the former military base. This artificial line drawn through Tartu's beautiful natural landscapes of forests, lakes and rolling hills is a powerful symbol and the resulting building is a long ramp-shaped structure generated by the slight slant of the runway. As the building lifts off the ground it creates a series of covered spaces that house the museum's various highly functional complexes. The interiors and exteriors are separated by a light glass wall, so the only real difference between the inside and the outside is the sloping roof and the air conditioning of the environments. This means the exhibition area is in continuous visual interaction with the outside landscape thanks to a sophisticated glass buffering system that guarantees a high level of heat insulation, as well as an influx of indirect natural light on the North side, where the exhibitions and public areas are located. The Southern side of the building, on the other hand, houses offices, libraries and teaching halls that enjoy direct sunlight. The top of the building is lit by 53 W ceiling-mounted Linealuce luminaires, while 20 W floor-recessed luminaires highlight the project's main feature: the museum's glass frontage and the glass wall between the inside and outside. Both versions have Wall Grazing optics and a Neutral White colour temperature. This creates a homogeneous effect over the entire length and height of the building, whereas the museum entrance is lit by a network of Light Up Walk light points positioned under the entrance ceiling. They are all LED luminaires, so they also help reduce the building's energy consumption levels as specifically requested by the Estonian Ministry of Culture. The project was also awarded the AFEX (Overseas French Architects) prize, that recognises the excellence of French architecture around the world.
 

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  • Year:
    2016
  • Client:
    Ministry of Culture of Estonia
  • Architectural project:
    DGT, Dorell Ghotmeh Tane ARCHITECTS
  • Lighting project:
    Atelier Hervé Audibert
  • Photographer:
    Takuji Shimmura

Products Used:

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